How To Mix Botox and Prepare Syringes

How To Mix Botox and Prepare Syringes

Botox is one of the most widely sought out cosmetic treatments of today. Many are flocking to their local injector to get this treatment done, making it one of the top five non surgical treatments ranked by RealSelf. 
 
What Botox is used for does not seem to be the issue for most, but more so how to use it. Many come to us confused because when they receive their Botox, the vial appears to be empty. But this is not the case. When Botox is injected, it is of course a liquid, but many do not know the form it comes in before the injection happens.
 
Here at Viana Care, we’ve heard that many have questions about toxins, so we’re here to clear up any confusion.
 
Today, we’ll be discussing Botox, how to mix as well as how long you can store it.
 
What is Botox, and Why Does it Matter?
 
Botox is the trade name for Botulinum Toxin Type A, which is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Botox works by blocking nerve signals in the muscles where it is injected. Without movement of these selected muscles in the face, certain wrinkles may be softened, reduced, or even removed.
 
Botox only works on wrinkles that are caused by muscle movement. These are known as dynamic wrinkles, and are often called "expression lines." Botox will not work on fine lines and wrinkles caused by sagging or loss of plumpness in the face, which are known as static wrinkles. The most common dynamic wrinkles that Botox can treat are lines on the upper face, such as the "11" between the brows, horizontal lines on the forehead, and crow's feet around the eyes. 
 
First, let's dabble into a few commonly asked questions about Botox.
 
Why is my vial empty?
 
Botox almost always comes in a powdered form (with the exception of our friend Innotox) and the fine powder is a very high concentrate of botulinum. This powder is so fine that it can almost be missed, but be rest assured that all of your units are accounted for. 
 
How To Mix Botox and Prepare Syringes
 
I don't want to dilute my Botox.
 
Due to the fact that Botox is typically packaged as a powder and saline needs to be added to it, it is technically always diluted by the time it reaches your face.
 
Which toxin lasts longer? Innotox, Botulax, Neuronox, etc. And what is the reason?
 
There is no definite answer which of these and other botulinum toxins lasts longer, unfortunately. All are derived from botulinum toxin type A. It all depends on our individual characteristics of the body. Stress, hormonal changes, physical activity also affects the action of toxins.
 
Is there any addiction to the toxin? Is it necessary to periodically change the brand?
 
There is no addiction to botox, but perhaps getting the procedure done because the results are so satisfying! We recommend changing Botox type every year.

How soon should I use my Botox? If I can store it, how long can it be stored?
 
Any toxins and even Innotox should be used within 24 hours. It is best to use it as soon as possible but a study done by the National Center for Biotechnology Information showed that “the potency of reconstituted Botox is not degraded by subsequent refrigeration for 4 weeks. However, there are definite concerns regarding its sterility, and hence its safety, since multiple withdrawals from the same vial over long periods can introduce bacterial contamination.” (2013)

Now let’s get into how this can be mixed and used at home
 
Upon receiving your vial, you will notice that the vial only has the fine powder as described before. In order for this botox to be used, it must be mixed with saline. As we are ready to anticipate your needs, we have added a bottle of saline with each purchase of botox so that you can mix easily at home. The amount of saline that comes with each vial of botox is 20ml.
 
The amount of units you’ve purchased will determine the amount of saline that needs to be added to the vial. 
  • 50 units - 1.25ml
  • 100 units - 2.5ml
  • 200 units - 5ml
Once you’ve determined the amount of saline to add to your vial, carefully use a syringe needle to draw up the correct amount of saline. At this point, the plastic covering on the top of the vial needs to be peeled back. From the syringe, the needle needs to puncture the top of the vial. 
 
From there, the syringe will apply itself to the bottle. Once all of the saline is in the vial, remove the needle from the vial and gentle turn the vial to mix the saline and powder. Do not shake it.
 
And voila! There you have it, perfectly mixed Botox. 
Want to know more about cosmeceutical skin care? Check out our articles to learn a thing or two. Ready to order Botox? Check out our variety on our website.
 
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